Archive for the ‘Strategic Planning’ Category

Communication: A Key Element of Building Trust

Friday, March 24th, 2017

By M Dana Baldwin, Senior Consultant

Strategic Planning Expert

Trust is a key element in business relationships.  Without trust, it can be much more difficult to get your people to engage effectively in your business.  It can be harder to get your message across to everyone in the business.  And it will most likely impede progress toward building the culture you want and obtaining the results you are aiming for in your strategic planning implementation.

Effective communications inside the organization are one of the keys to building trust. At the highest level, people need to see that you are willing to give them what they need in terms of information about the goals and objectives of the organization. Unless your people know what you want from them, and how those expectations impact what they do, it can be difficult to get everyone pulling their oars in the right direction. If you communicate to your people what is expected of them, and, importantly, why it is expected and how their efforts impact the results of the organization, those results should be better and more attainable. Included in this area should be two-way communications.  Do you value the input and ideas your staff can offer?  Do you listen attentively and respond fairly and objectively?  Do your people feel comfortable enough to trust you with their ideas, and to expect you will evaluate and value their input?

Do you keep your word?  Can people trust you to do what you say and to live to the standards you have expressed to them in your communications with them?  When you make a mistake, and everyone does on occasion, do you openly acknowledge your error and do everything possible to make it right?  Do you hold yourself to the same standards you expect them to attain?  Are you leading by example?

Do you share your strategies and plans with your people? People need to understand where the organization is going in order to make their own contributions to the overall results.  Have you effectively communicated with them so they know what is the overall course and direction of the company?

Focus on good results and contributions, and do so in public, so others see you supporting your people.  If you need to criticize someone, do so in private.  This helps the individual being criticized to understand that you respect them, and that you are trying to help them.  Criticizing someone in public is humiliating to not only the person being berated, but also anyone else who views the scene.

Concentrate on building long term relationships, built on values, basic principles and high level ethics. Think long term and how your actions affect everyone you are in contact with in the organization.  Building trust through effective communications at multiple levels will help build your team’s confidence and effectiveness.  This will help you attain the long term results you are aiming for from your strategic planning.  Your team will support you and give you the effort needed to move the organization in the direction you are striving to go.

We can help with your team building, strategy formulation and effective implementation.  Contact me at baldwin@cssp.com or at 616-575-3193 to discuss how we may help you.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

M. Dana Baldwin is a Senior Consultant with Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc. He can be reached by email at: baldwin@cssp.com

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution.

Understanding the Competitive Value of Your Brand – Part Four

Friday, March 17th, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Understanding the Competitive Value of your Brand published in Compass Points September 2005.  In Part One, we introduced the series and discussed What makes a brand valuable?  In Part Two, we discussed Why branding is important in the global marketplace.  In Part Three, we discussed How to evaluate your brand.  Finally, we will discuss So your brand isn’t that valuable – is there hope?

So your brand isn’t that valuable – is there hope?

In some cases, companies run into a “brick wall” when they objectively evaluate their own brand. This can be caused by a number of factors, but the outcome is the same: some brands just don’t mean anything to the customer, and so do not carry any premium in the marketplace. Naturally, such brands offer little defense against inexpensive foreign competition, and companies that rely too heavily on brand power that doesn’t really exist inevitably get into hot water as foreign competition uses its compelling power – the lower price – to erode the market share of domestic competitors.

Is there a “crash course” way to build brand? Yes – but it’s inherently risky and not for the faint of heart. This is because branding is driven by the brains of our customers, not our desires. In order to build a strong, positive awareness of your brand in a hurry, you will have to do something that stands out. By “stands out” we don’t mean “is a bit better” – we mean something that is truly remarkable, or, in other words “worthy of remark”. Customers don’t make remarks about brands that are a little better – they remark on differences that they find really interesting.

An excellent example of something remarkable is the Honda Element. This is a truly distinctive design in the overcrowded sport utility vehicle market. The design is, in fact, so unusual that it almost never made it into production. Marketing people at Honda were extremely uncomfortable that the design was so different from any other brand in the SUV market that they wanted to scrap it. The designers won the fight to manufacture a small number of Elements as a “niche” product, along with a more mainstream design. By the end of the first year of production, the Element was outselling the “safe” design by five to one!

The lesson here is clear: if you are behind some savvy competitors, you should be prepared to seriously consider strategic options that make you uncomfortable. We wouldn’t recommend betting the farm on outlandish new brands – in most cases – but we would suggest that having one or two every couple of years might just push your brand into the lead by giving you a reputation for having edgy, innovative products.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Getting Everything Done

Friday, March 10th, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

One of the sticky problems most people face in strategic planning is execution.  Over 80% of executives we survey in our seminars cite strategy implementation as their biggest issue with strategic planning.  Meeting strategic objectives is difficult enough that many companies bypass this part of the strategy process and focus most of their effort on key performance metrics.  While performance metrics – such as Balanced Scorecard – can play a useful role in implementing strategy, they tend to fall short in the areas of true strategic change and innovation.  This is because good strategies – for many companies – may involve forays into new technologies, markets and processes.

In such situations, it can be difficult, if not impossible, to manage change through the use of metrics – especially since the management team, while familiar with their current operational metrics, may have little experience with understanding the numbers in new areas.  A good example of this can be seen in the transition from using print and broadcast advertising to advertising using SEO and social networks.  An experienced hand at print advertising could, indeed, make good inroads in digital marketing, but the numbers will at first seem meaningless – and then, possibly, much too large or small.  This is because the nature of interaction changes when you make such a big strategic shift – and the value of the eyeballs you may be accessing with your advertising can change dramatically based upon how they are targeted.  The metrics of the one world simply don’t help manage the metrics of the other, except at a very basic accounting level.

Getting real strategic objectives completed, then, is rarely a matter of moving the needle on a metric.  It’s much more likely to be a learning activity where the objective is simply knowing how to do the things needed – and then, ideally defining a path to mastery.

Without question, the greatest tools for getting this kind of objective done are project-based, and tend to have three things in common:

  1. Sound objective setting
  2. Realistic resource allocation
  3. Routine progress review

A process that assures a simple, but robust approach to these things will greatly enhance real strategic activity directed towards your objectives.  How does your process stack up?

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Understanding the Competitive Value of Your Brand – Part Three

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Understanding the Competitive Value of your Brand published in Compass Points September 2005.  In Part One, we introduced the series and discussed What makes a brand valuable?  In Part Two, we discussed Why branding is important in the global marketplace.  In this post we will discuss How to evaluate your brand.

How to evaluate your brand

Objectively evaluating your brand is difficult, especially if you want to put an exact dollar number on it. Fortunately, this is usually not required for good strategic decision making. Still, it’s a good idea to have at least a general concept of the value of your brand when you are considering strategic options.

The most objective way to evaluate your brand is to measure the outcomes that occur with and without the use of your brand. Sometimes this is simple, because the way you market may well lend itself to testing different hypothesis about your brand. For example, a seminar company might test mailing brochures that feature (or don’t feature) specific brands, to find out the extent to which one of those brands is pulling in attendees at the seminars. Likewise, if you have the wherewithal, you might go so far as to test selling a “generic” version of your product in the marketplace to see if it can carry the same price as your current brand – at acceptable volumes. This is a little more difficult with retail products, as some retailers will insist on only stocking brand name products on their shelves. In addition, retail stores – especially large chains – typically demand some kind of compensation for the use of their shelf space, which makes retail brand testing quite expensive.

If testing is out of the question, you can also approximate brand value by looking at the popularity and price of competing brands with little or no brand power. If you don’t have an absolutely generic “no-name” competitor, it can be difficult to be objective about this – after all, how do you decide which competitor has the least brand power? Also, there may be some confusion about value because there are several components to the success of a brand:

Brand Sales = (Cost + Margin) * Volume

If you were to attempt a calculation of brand value, you would be faced with extracting non-brand factors which affect these three numbers. For example, cost can go up or down depending on operation skills, management, underlying cost structure, and purchasing skills. Margin may be driven by brand power, pricing skill, and power in the distribution/retail channels. And volume can be affected by both cost and margin, brand power, and distribution network, as well as underlying demand for the products or services being offered.

Even so, at the end of the day your brand gets you one of two measurable outcomes: margin or volume. Comparing your margins to the competition is one way to assess the value of your brand, if you take heed of the caveat about other factors which may change margin. Comparing volume is less likely to yield a good estimate of brand value, because you can – in many markets – drive higher volumes with no brand value at all by charging lower prices. This, by the way, is a terrible strategy to be following if you are concerned about cheaper foreign competition, because there are significant costs that you simply will not be able to beat your foreign competitors on.

In the next post of this series, we will discuss So your brand isn’t that valuable – is there hope?

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Strategic Planning: A Time for Reflection

Friday, February 24th, 2017

By Denise Harrison

Strategic Planning Expert
Denise Harrison

In today’s fast paced economy, we often find that executives think that they don’t have the time to reflect on their business.  While quick decision-making is important, taking the time to reflect on the possible choices and looking at long-term implications will set your business on a course to achieve long-term success.

Reflection: What does this mean?

There are three areas that we often find are missing when teams develop a strategic plan:

  1. Discussion of topics for research
  2. Collection of research in a consistent format
  3. Analysis tools that help the team think through what is the best use of the company’s resources

Topics for Research

Many teams have a two to three-day retreat to develop a strategy; this is a good time for team building and gets ideas out on the table.  But if your strategic planning is done during this retreat, we often find that the team does not have all the information to make good decisions.  Our recommendation is a more-robust three-step process:

  1. Situation Analysis

Select the topics that require further research (markets, competition, opportunities, etc.)  Selecting these topics and then developing research allows the team to have better information for decision making when they get to the next step.

  1. Strategy Formulation

Review the information to have a shared base of knowledge and make decision based on this information. Now you can select the strategies and the strategic initiatives that are most likely to position your company for future success. Take the time to develop action plans for your strategic initiatives so that you know what steps need to be undertaken, who is responsible and how much time and money each step will take.

  1. Implementation

Vet the action plans to ensure that accomplishing the steps will achieve the objective and assess whether the company has sufficient talent and financial resources to accomplish the task set out in the action plans.

This three-step process allows your company to reflect on the correct topics to research.  Once the research is completed, the team can reflect on the information gathered to make informed decisions concerning the future direction of the company.

Consistent Format

After you select the topics for research and develop the research, it is important that the information is collected in a consistent format.  Having templates that aid in consistent information development allows for better analysis as your team develops its strategy.  For example, without a consistent format, you will get different information regarding opportunities to be researched and this will make it hard to compare options because the data is inconsistent.

Analysis

Once you have reviewed the research and the team has a shared base of knowledge, it is important to use analytical tools to assess where the best opportunities lie in your business. Tools include the Growth/Share matrix (often associated with Jack Welch) to assess which of your core business should get the most emphasis.  Analytical tools pull out the key variables and help the team better understand the information that has been gathered.

If you would like to learn more about a structured process, with templates for research and analytical tools to help digest the information please call or email me: Denise Harrison, 910-763-5194 or harrison@cssp.com

To learn how to take your strategic planning to the next level, please listen to our webinar:  Why Isn’t My Strategic Plan Working?.

Denise Harrison is a senior consultant for the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  She can be reached at  harrison@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution.

Understanding the Competitive Value of Your Brand – Part Two

Friday, February 17th, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Understanding the Competitive Value of your Brand published in Compass Points September 2005.  In Part One, we introduced the series and discussed What makes a brand valuable?  In Part Two, we will discuss Why branding is important in the global marketplace.

Why branding is important in the global marketplace

In an increasingly global market, branding can serve two distinct functions that may be useful to you: first, a “local” brand gives you an entrenched customer base that is more difficult (and expensive) to displace, and second, a “global” brand can give you a foot in the door when seeking to enter new geographic areas. Be forewarned: building a “global” brand is expensive, and often a “local” brand can be just as costly. Even so, the brand can be a useful offensive tool and defensive tool when you are competing with non-local companies.

There is one reason why “local” brands can be more cost-effective, and a good tool for defending your home turf from foreign competition: brand success is built upon three critical factors:

  1. Understanding the key values in the mind of your customer
  2. Knowing how to put the customer’s values into your product or service
  3. Effectively associating your brand with those values

Two of these factors, understanding your customer and associating your brand with values, are very much defined by culture. Thus, someone from outside your culture – and this could even be someone who speaks the same language from a different region – will find it much more difficult to get an accurate read on what your customer’s key values are, and how to convince the customer that his product or service embodies those values. This is not saying that a foreign competitor cannot do this – just that it’s a lot more expensive and difficult.

In the next post of this series, we will discuss How to evaluate your brand.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Team Building at the Executive Level

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Strategic Planning Expert

M Dana Baldwin, Senior Consultant

Executive team building principles: What are some basics?  While one could write reams on executive team building, and indeed, many have, much of what shakes out of a deep analysis of the subject results in the whole thing being boiled down to some basic principles.  Although a short article like this can only skim the surface of the subject, here are some key points to consider.

First Principle: Have the right people on the team or, as Jim Collins wrote, “have the right people on the bus.”  This presumes you have developed a solid course and direction on which the bus should be driven. Many different attributes can be used to determine who those people are, and every company or organization will have its own definitions of what attributes pertain best to that organization.  In general terms, all need to be expert in their primary areas of responsibility.  All need to have sufficient experience to allow them to see and understand the perspectives of their teammates as well.  All must have the ability to communicate effectively both at the executive team level as well as in other layers of the organization.

By implication, having the right people on the bus also means getting the “wrong” people off the bus.  Nothing can throw a rock into the gears of an operation like having someone who simply doesn’t fit.  This definitely does not imply that anyone should be a “yes person”, but on occasion, people simply do not fit the culture of the organization at the top levels.

Second Principle: People at the top of an organization have no more hours available in the day than others in the organization.  To be effective, they should be concentrating on those vital activities which only they can do, and be willing and able to delegate effectively the rest to others in their part of the organization or consider not doing that part of the function at all.  An inability to delegate effectively will limit the productivity of the executive and hamper the results of the whole organization.

Third Principle: Monitor output and results tirelessly.  That does not mean that one should micro-manage.  It does imply that on a regular basis, with frequency determined by the importance of the project or duty, one should keep abreast of what progress is being made, what is scheduled to be done in the next time period, what problems have arisen and what is being done about solving the problems or even, changing the duty or project action plan to meet changing conditions.

If your team is having challenges with any of the principles above, you should first be sure your organization has a sound course and direction toward which you are aiming.  To do this, a comprehensive strategic plan with a robust execution process is vital.  We can help you achieve your strategic plan.  Give me a call at 616-575-3193 or email me at baldwin@cssp.com.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

M. Dana Baldwin is a Senior Consultant with Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc. He can be reached by email at: baldwin@cssp.com

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution.

Understanding the Competitive Value of your Brand – Part 1

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Brand IS a competitive advantage

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Understanding the Competitive Value of your Brand published in Compass Points September 2005.  In this part we will introduce the series and discuss What makes a brand valuable?

One of the most commonly overlooked sources of competitive advantage is brand. Branding is not just advertising, nor is it simply a catchy name for a company or product. The most important value in a brand is the value that it holds for actual customers. This value is very difficult and expensive to build – and fragile and easy to destroy. The difficulty of building and maintaining a brand is one reason why managers the world over tend to avoid spending much time or money on branding – especially in smaller companies. This is a shame, because a well-managed brand is so powerful that it can overcome almost any other competitive advantage. This one fact is the reason why larger companies with lots of managerial horsepower tend to spend a lot of time and money on branding.

What makes a brand valuable?

Brands are valuable simply because they cause customers to be inclined to purchase your product rather than someone else’s. In a way, a brand is shorthand for the things the customer can expect from your product. In products that hold little meaning for the customer, this might be worth less, but in markets where the customer invests his or her ego in the purchase of a particular brand, that meaning can be priceless. Let’s look at some examples to see where branding may or may not be important.

First of all, let’s look at some examples of brands with tremendous pull. These brands will sell well just about anywhere they show up, because the customer associates the brand with qualities they prefer. Examples include:

Disney
Nintendo
Sony
Harley Davidson
Apple

Interestingly, none of these brands has universal appeal, in that not every possible customer will prefer the attributes of the brand over their alternatives. For example, the Disney brand is applied to many products:

Theme Parks
Movies
Licensed products such as clothing and toys
Computer games
Time shares
Cruise line
Broadway shows
Television programming

In each of these very different product areas, the Disney brand means something a little different. For example, in theme parks, Disney means clean, family-oriented, creatively designed, expensive and (to many) crowded. The negative elements of the Disney branding in their theme park business are inevitable – you always have to accept the negative with the positive. But the positive elements are so compelling that millions of people from around the world spend a significant portion of their income to travel to a Disney theme park.

The Apple brand has a similar story. Apple carries a number of meanings, including well designed, easy to use, less popular and expensive. As with any great brand, this brand has a lot of ego invested in it for some people. This aspect of branding is more visible in computers because it is significantly more difficult and time consuming to use a computer operating system that isn’t the most popular (in other words, Microsoft). Despite this difficulty, Apple has a hard core of fans who wouldn’t think of using another brand, given a choice. Clearly, this doesn’t translate into top market share for Apple, but it is a significant advantage that has clearly kept the Apple name alive when others have fallen by the wayside. Apple’s newer products – notable the iPod – have drawn upon the positive elements of the Apple brand. The negative elements of the Apple brand have been far less problematic for the iPod because it is competing in a new product area where niche status has not been seen as a drawback. This is an excellent example of using a brand to grow beyond the core product line.

In the next post of this series, we will discuss Why branding is important in the global marketplace.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Strategic Evaluation of Acquisition Targets – Part Two

Friday, January 27th, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Strategic Evaluation of Acquisition Targets published in Compass Points September 2008.  In part one we introduced the series and discussed Market Impact.  In this part we will discuss Technology impactHuman resource impact, Distribution impact, and Supplier market impact.

Technology impact

Sometimes you may consider an acquisition because the target company owns a technology that will be strategically useful to your company. This is usually strategically valuable when a technology can differentiate your company by helping you meet a specific customer need or preference better than your competition.

Human resource impact

In some situations, the human resources of a target company will create value for the acquiring company. While just having warm bodies will only create value in a time of labor shortage (which we saw in technology companies during the dot com boom), it’s not uncommon to see specific skilled employees creating a considerable part of the perceived value of the target. For example, insurance agencies may find other agencies desirable because they have a number of skilled and experienced producers. Likewise, in technology, you may want to acquire a company to get a team that is especially skilled in a certain type of software (such as mobile device social media) because the technological competency of the team will help you meet customer needs better — or even create a wildly differentiated product.

Distribution impact

An acquisition target may give you enhanced ability to penetrate a new distribution channel — or give you the concentrated power to dictate terms to an existing channel. For example, Acco Corporation owns several well-known office product brands, which gives the company increased leverage with powerful office superstore chains.

Supplier market impact

Leverage is not restricted to customers and distribution channels — if you control most of a market, you may also have greater bargaining power with suppliers. This may allow you to dictate product features, terms or even pricing with your supplier base, because you have power over their access to your market. This kind of power gives companies like Walmart the ability to have much higher profitability than competitors, because selling to the largest customer can be the key element in maintaining dominant market share.

As you can see, there are many ways an acquired company can add real value to your bottom line beyond simply adding sales volume or cash flow.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution

Strategic Evaluation of Acquisition Targets – Part One

Friday, January 20th, 2017

By Robert W. Bradford, President & CEO

This post is part of a series taken from Robert Bradford’s article Strategic Evaluation of Acquisition Targets published in Compass Points September 2008.  In this part we will introduce the series and discuss Market Impact.

Strategic Planning Expert
Robert W. Bradford

You are considering purchasing another company to accelerate the growth of your business. The company has $10 million in sales and shows a profit of $1 million. Physical assets and cash are pretty low — only $500,000 and the recent growth rate has been a modest, but consistent 4%. The owner wants $20 million for the company. Is this a good deal for you or not? Should you buy the company?

Obviously, from a purely financial perspective, the above deal doesn’t look particularly attractive. There are plenty of resources for evaluating the value of an acquisition target from a financial perspective. In other articles, we have examined the strategic reasons for pursuing an acquisition and factors which will make some targets more strategically attractive for you. In this article, we will take a quick look at the other strategic factors that may dramatically change your assessment of the value of an acquisition target.

There are four factors you will want to consider in evaluating an acquisition:

  1. Financial value
  2. Asset value to your company
  3. Possible resale value of the company and its assets
  4. Strategic impact on your company
    • Market impact
    • Technology impact
    • Human resource impact
    • Distribution impact
    • Supplier market impact

We will not spend much time on the assessment of the first three items, because they are well-addressed elsewhere. The fourth, strategic impact can most easily be assessed by deciding to treat the strategic impact as an element of financial value, asset value or resale value — but this requires making some very specific assumptions.

  1. Market impact

Market impact is the effect that combining your company with the target will have on market behaviors. For example, reducing the number of competitors may decrease price competition, increasing margins for the remaining competitors. A combined company may also generate higher value for customers by offering a broader product line, simplifying terms or raising the overall quality and service levels in the market. These will, in turn, enable the acquiring company to strategically shift the competitive dynamic so that market success is dictated by different strategic competencies.

In the next post in this series, we will discuss Technology impact, Human resource impact, Distribution impact and Supplier market impact.

To learn ways to take your strategic planning to the next level please listen to our webinar:  Why my strategic planning isn’t working.

Robert Bradford is President/CEO of the Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc.  He can be reached at rbradford@cssp.com.

© Copyright 2017 by Center for Simplified Strategic Planning, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI — Reprint permission granted with full attribution